The Best Places to Live and Work as a Moviemaker 2019: Big Cities

9. Montreal, Quebec

Montreal is sometimes referred to as Canada’s “smoking and drinking section,” and if that’s not cosmopolitan enough for you, try this: Since November, physicians of the Médecins francophones du Canada have been in a one-year pilot program that permits them to prescribe visits to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts to patients they believe may benefit from the healing power of art. They might, for instance, take in the abstract paintings of Jean-Paul Riopelle at the MMFA or wander to the Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything exhibition at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC) before it embarks on its world tour in April 2019. 

High art isn’t everyone’s cup of tea; you might prefer a stroll through Montreal’s ultra-hip Mile End neighborhood, offering vintage dresses to bagel shops and brewpubs, or a tour of St.-Laurent Boulevard in the Plateau district, which is a scrolling canvas of street art, so much so that mural tours have sprung up in its wake. Montreal also has its own Little Italy, with popular restaurants and wine bars such as the new Mon Lapin (My Rabbit) or the Pizzeria Napoletana, in business since 1948, or you can just grab a maple bacon donut from the Trou de Beigne donut shop. 

Is it any wonder the culture vultures at Netflix are putting down roots here? In 2017 the streaming giant made a soft commitment to invest $500 million in Canadian programming over the next five years, as well as to spend $25 million on Francophone content exclusively, and in fall 2018 the company claimed to be on track to exceed that pledge. Netflix’s teen soccer drama 21 Thunder was shot in Montreal last year, while the Adam Sandler/Jennifer Aniston comedy Murder Mystery was shot in the Le Plateau-Mont-Royal borough this summer. The big guns—literally—rolled in during the fall as Roland Emmerich’s war epic Midway began filming in Montreal. Montreal is known as a reliable doubling city, having stood in for New Delhi in The Day After Tomorrow and as Saigon (with CGI palm trees) for X-Men: Days of Future Past.

Woody Harrelson on the Montreal set of Roland Emmerich’s Midway, which went before cameras in 2018. Courtesy of Instagram

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

10 Comments

  1. BeepBop

    February 11, 2019 at 1:21 am

    So are we talking mostly production crew jobs for these cities? What about post-production? Seems like a lot of productions are still farming out the post work to post houses back in LA, including overnighting dailies back and forth via FedEx.

  2. Mike Thomas Leghorn

    January 17, 2019 at 6:31 am

    LOL Cinestate in Dallas – “Dallas has the most bang for the buck”
    However they only shoot their micro budget films in Dallas. Anything with a decent budget goes out of state to an incentive based area.

  3. j

    January 16, 2019 at 11:35 pm

    This is for Bruce…

    If you’re new or just entering this industry LA and NY are the last places you want to go… that is unless you want to either a) edit for a porn house or b) work at a red Lobster to survive while to wait your turn to get in behind a million others wanting to do the same thing. As for Altanta- good luck with that. How ya gonna network with people? It’s so sprawled out your chances of running into another industry person at a restaurant, bar or other social atmosphere is right up there with being struck by lightning. As for Texas, it’s not a film hub state. Ontario you say? Well, might as well be in Atlanta. Not only is New Mexico a thriving production hub, it’s a MAJOR incentive state, so much so Netflix outright purchased Albuquerque Studios just a few months ago. Aside from that few major studio executives want to travel to Atlanta. On the other hand Santa Fe is a luxury city, just 1.5 hr flight from LA, and major studio executives make excuses to visit and that leads me to networking. Santa Fe while being posh it really quaint. Literally every time I’ve visited, stayed at a hotel, visited a bar, or just grabbed a coffee I’ve met someone in the industry. Next, less competition… in New Mexico there is high demand for crew and not always enough crew available, making it easier for someone to break in. For those of us that have a strong personal network it doesn’t matter where you live because your network keeps you gainfully employed. So starve in LA and NY with a high cost of living, or start working, networking and learning in a place like New Mexico?

  4. Peter Matthews

    January 16, 2019 at 9:01 pm

    Very interesting. Did you only consider the Americas in this survey?

  5. Frank Casanova

    January 16, 2019 at 7:28 pm

    Outside of the top 10 or 11 noted here, the rest are generally considered “locations”, not production centers. A city must have significant production infrastructure to be a production center. Most don’t have that. Moreover, the “deals” will still be made in Los Angeles and New York. Carnahan is just wishin’ and hopin’.

  6. Alex C.

    January 16, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    Absolutely stunned that this compilation left out Cleveland, Ohio–where many comic book block busters have been made in recent years. Cleveland has a wonderful, hard-working Film Commission, and a significant tax credit. Plus there is a great talent base there, the people are friendly, and cost of living is relatively low. What more can you ask for?

  7. Bruce

    January 16, 2019 at 12:30 pm

    Meh. If you want to work as a filmmaker – meaning getting paid for your work, and working consistently – you’re still better off in Los Angeles or New York. Or Atlanta, which has done great work in positioning itself as a hub where production professionals can work steadily.

    This is not to say that the other cities on the list don’t have thriving film scenes (as an ex Austinite with many friends in the Austin and San Antonio film communities, I am well aware that much talent and passion exists all over the country), but unless you want to make your income primarily from, say, car dealership commercials, you’re better off in ATL, NYC or LA.

    (Not that there’s anything wrong with doing car dealership commercials, btw! The tone of the article suggests that we’re primarily talking about feature film and TV work, though)

    • Jon

      January 17, 2019 at 1:59 am

      .Arrogant ass. Our crews are THE BEST and would kick ass over any orher city’s production team(s). What an idiot.

      • ANTI-SNARK

        January 17, 2019 at 11:58 am

        Jon, you come off just as arrogant! Our crews are very good but many have left NM for NYC. Your war cry makes us look bad. Back off and let our work do the talking!

      • Lamont

        January 17, 2019 at 1:34 pm

        Jon, seems like you’re the arrogant ass. Bruce was only being truthful about the best production cities. At the end of the day, there’s plenty of talented crews in the states mentioned. What have you done that’s “so called” better than other crews? Grow up. The TX tax incentives suck and there’s really not any productions going on in the state. Only Robert Rodriguez movies, who is an awesome filmmaker. How about you move to where the action really is and prove yourself??? You’re immature ego is ridiculous.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.